Jel – 10 Seconds (CD, US)

2002 Mush MH-208
01. Multi Pitch
02. Multi Level
03. Exit Multi Mode
04. Dynamic Button
05. Close..
06. Define Mix
07. Select Mix
08. Channel Assign
09. Decay/Tune Select
10. Forget It
11. European4
12. ..Your..
13. Changing Patterns
14. Loop/Truncate
15. Delete Sound
16. 1st Song/Step
17. MIDI Parameters
18. Special
19. ..Ears.
20. Tip Unfiltered
21. Time Signature
22. Subsong
23. Auto Correct

VIEW:
NOTES:
Jel album featuring a sample of Fuck Shit Up by The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion on the track Decay/Tune Select. Also issued on as a double vinyl LP.

The album can be streamed via Bandcamp.com.

Link: http://jelsmusic.bandcamp.com/album/10-seconds

SONG CREDITS:
01. Multi Pitch
Run Time: 2:32

02. Multi Level
Run Time: 3:38

03. Exit Multi Mode
Run Time: 3:38

04. Dynamic Button
Feat. Dax Pierson / Odd Nosdam
Run Time: 5:24

05. Close..
Run Time: 0:51

06. Define Mix
Run Time: 2:23

07. Select Mix
Feat. Dose One
Run Time: 1:08

08. Channel Assign
Run Time: 4:10

09. Decay/Tune Select
Run Time: 0:59

10. Forget It
Run Time: 1:37

11. European4
Run Time: 0:38

12. ..Your..
Run Time: 1:31

13. Changing Patterns
Run Time: 0:48

14. Loop/Truncate
Run Time: 2:51

15. Delete Sound
Run Time: 2:08

16. 1st Song/Step
Run Time: 0:52

17. MIDI Parameters
Run Time: 2:12

18. Special
Run Time: 2:38

19. ..Ears.
Run Time: 4:35

20. Tip Unfiltered
Run Time: 1:25

21. Time Signature
Run Time: 3:42

22. Subsong
Feat. Alias
Run Time: 6:04

23. Auto Correct
Run Time: 1:23

SLEEVE NOTES:
The first thing you notice about any SP-1200 beat is that it’s dirty. Dirty, dirty like the South, dirty, dirty like city gutters, dirty, dirty like project hallways. Sharp, clean drums get dragged through the grit; clear, resounding baselines become dark and murky; and bright horns sound slathered in layers of grime. Blame the specs – when E-Mu Systems debuted the SP-12 in 1985 (the SP-1200, which added a disc drive followed two years later), it only had 12 its of sampling power, perilously shy of the 16 bits that are standard for “life-like” sound. Hi-fi audiophiles might have hated it, but early producers like Ced Gee and Paul C, they heard something unexpected in the static crackle of the SP – they heard funk.

The majority of funk classics, from James Brown’s million-sellers to little-known local bands cultivated a dirty, dusty, low-down sound that spoke to the earthy grit of Southern fields as much as the concrete blocks of the urban metropolis. That the SP managed to replicate that sound through its lack of sophistication echoed the very sentiment of hip-hop itself: making more out of less. That ethic was put to the test by the SP’s paltry 10 seconds of sampling time, further split into 4 banks of 2.5 seconds each, barely enough time to slip in a one-bar loop. Faced with a serious restriction, intrepid producers learned to chop their loops and breaks into smaller parts, then rebuild them with the SP’s drum machine-like pads. What began as a limitation fashioned an innovation. Before long, hip-hop producers around the world flocked to the SO for its ease of use and signature sound.

While more powerful samplers abound, the SP-1200 has remained popular. From Mantronix to Marley Marl to the Beastie Boys to Large Professor to the Bomb Squad to DJ Muggs to the RZA to Jel, the SP-1200 still has the same small processor, the same small sampling time and the same big sound that’s formed the very foundation of hip-hop’s sonic past, present and future.
(Oliver Wang)”

DETAILS:
ARTWORK: [no details given]

BARCODE: 6 63405 12082 9

MATRIX: “RPP-CACR53156 MH208 – 10 SECONDS”

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