V/A feat. Beck Kill The Moonlight (CD, US)

1997 Sympathy For The Record Industry SFTRI 482
01. Beck – Leave Me on the Moon
02. The Pussywillows – Vindaloo
03. The Dynamics – Spaghetti Ride
04. The Raunch Hands – Green Room
05. Pam Aronoff – TV Jazz
06. Go To Blazes – (And I’ll Be) Hating You
07. The Powder Monkeys – The Wizard
08. Beck – Last Night I Traded My
Souls Innermost For Some Pickled Fish
09. Delta Garage – Blue Eyes
10. Thomas Hendrix – Driver Winner
11. World Famous Blue Jays – Cookin’ With Jay
12. Go To Blazes – Bad Cup Of Coffee
13. Beck – Underwater Music
14. The Dynamics – Tube Glory
15. Martha Atwell – Wildwood Flower
16. Thomas Hendrix – Can’t Find My Car
17. Pam Aronoff – Clear
18. Delta Garage – Catfish Trilogy
V/A feat. Beck Kill The Moonlight (CD, US)  - Cover
VIEW:
NOTES:
Soundtrack CD album to the Steve Hanft feature film Kill The Moonlight features Russell Simins on the Beck song Leave Me On The Moon.

The CD / DVD edition has a different track listing and includes additional Beck songs.

Steve Hanft directed the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion video for Orange album track Dang. Beck appeared on Roosevelt Hotel Blues (Now I Got Worry [2010]) and Flavor (Orange). Jon Spencer appeared on the Beck song Diskobox (Odelay).

SONG CREDITS:
01. Beck – Leave Me on the Moon
Writer: Beck Hansen
Published: Cyanide Breath Mint Music (ASCAP)
Drums: Russell Simins
Guitar: Beck Hansen
Vocals: Beck Hansen

02. The Pussywillows – Vindaloo
Writers: The Pussywillows

03. The Dynamics – Spaghetti Ride
Writer: Ed Ruscha

04. The Raunch Hands – Green Room
Writers: Chandler and Mariconda
Published: Dick Fore Music

05. Pam Aronoff – TV Jazz
Writer: Pam Arnoff
Published: Blood Sauce Music (ASCAP)

06. Go To Blazes – (And I’ll Be) Hating You
Writer: Johnny Paycheck

07. The Powder Monkeys – The Wizard
Writers: Black Sabbath

08. Beck – Last Night I Traded My Souls Innermost For Some Pickled Fish
Writer: Beck Hansen
Published: Cyanide Breath Mint Music (ASCAP)
Guitar (Acoustic Slide): Beck Hansen
Harmonica: Beck Hansen

09. Delta Garage – Blue Eyes
Writer: Ross Owens

10. Thomas Hendrix – Driver Winner
(audio bite from KTM)

11. World Famous Blue Jays – Cookin’ With Jay
Writer: Jay Sherman Godfrey

12. Go To Blazes – Bad Cup Of Coffee
Writer: Ed Warren
Published: Casa Diablo Music

13. Beck – Underwater Music
Writer: Beck Hansen
Published: Cyanide Breath Mint Music (ASCAP)
Guitar: Beck Hansen

14. The Dynamics – Tube Glory
Writer: Ed Ruscha

15. Martha Atwell – Wildwood Flower
Traditional folk song

16. Thomas Hendrix – Can’t Find My Car
(audio bite from KTM)

17. Pam Aronoff – Clear
Writer: Pam Arnoff
Published: Blood Sauce Music (ASCAP)

18. Delta Garage – Catfish Trilogy
Writers: Traditional / Didie Bohn Da – Ross Owens
Published: Pork and Beans – Rosa Lee Hill, Bug Music
Arranged: Ross Owens

SLEEVE NOTES:
Kill The Moonlight
The Motion Picture Soundtrack
A Film by
Steven Hanft

It is said that the space change that drops out of Sylvester Stallone’s trousers can feed a family of four for ten years. Indeed, a crafty independent filmmaker could probably knock off a small epic with the budget for cheese and crackers on Sly’s latest film. So it is frustrating when a cool film like Steven Hanft’s Kill the Moonlight collects dust in a closet for a lack of money. Thankfully this is no longer the case. A dead ringer for low-budget drive-in films of the 70’s in pacing, look, and acting Kill the Moonlight is a twisted comedy that tells the story of Chance, a laconic fishery worker/toxic waste cleaner whose main goal in life is to get his stock car fixed up.

Chance might be a total loser, but one can’t help but feel sympathy for him as he gets involved in pathetic money-raising schemes. In an example of life imitating art, Hanft found himself running out of money over and over again before he scraped up the dough together for a final print.

Jac Zinder

There will always be country bands in Nashville, polka bands in Minnesota, blues rock bands in beer commercials and surf bands in Los Angeles. The Dynamics formed, played, recorded and broke up in a shorter time span than the shelf life of buttermilk. They appear in the movie Kill the Moonlight as the garage band. The band consists of Stavros “the Arson” Arsenikos. Ed “Playboy” Rushca, and Adam “Albion” Mc Ewem. The Arsons says “the Dynamics were formed under a blessed union of microscopic tea bags”. Playboy says “the director of the movie had to pay an arm and a leg for the rights to Spaghetti Ride”. The Dynamics broke up later that year when Albion took a flight back to his home country of Great Britain to become an obituary writer.

One of the two songs by Go To Blazes on this soundtrack is a cover of a Johnny Paycheck song called “(And I’ll Be) Hating You.” When G.T.B. lead guitarist Tom Hamon first decided they should do a cover of the song he found out that Paycheck was in prison at the time for shooting a man in the head. The shooting happened after Paycheck and the man were in a bar fight over which meat was better tasting, deer meat or turtle meat. After two years of prison the governor or Ohio commuted Paycheck’s sentence, and the day Johnny got out was the same day the Go To Blazes single of “(And I’ll Be) Hating You” was first released. For more G.T.B. check out their singles on ESD, Glitterhouse, Get Hip, Estrus, Skyclad, Sky Ranch and Disel Only.

World Famous Blue Jays have been the soundtrack to many blurry evenings. One rainy night I saw them play 3 or 4 sets of crazy ridge rock. Billy Gibbons was there, drunk as a monk. They blazed through songs like “Good Morning Mr. Trucker”, and the classic “Cheeseburger Deluxe” (“I’ve only got five bucks, I’ll have a cheeseburger deluxe”). My favourite is the instrumental included here “Cookin’ With Jay”, which is one of the happiest songs ever. World Famous Blue Jays own and operate their own Brooklyn based 7″ singles only label called Diesel Only Records.

At the time Beck made up the songs for this soundtrack he was writing about ten songs a week and making a shitload of 4 track tapes. Most of the stuff was weird thrasher folk songs with surreal lyrics. He wasn’t getting booked to play very many shows in Los Angeles. So he would play before local bands uninvited. He had a beat up acoustic guitar with a rope for a strap which he’d bring to shows jump up on stage and play a couple of songs while the bands were setting up. People would get into his songs because they had a lot of rhymes. Beck and his friend Martha Atwell were really into old country music. They formed Ten Ton Ltd. and started playing Louvin Brothers and Carter Family songs. At one point they managed to get some shows at a bar up in the mountains of Saugus: the Big Oaks Lodge. It was a weird scene because they were playing traditional songs and there were old folks square dancing and college kids partying. One night Mike Tyson was there training for his fight against Buster Douglas, (they had a boxing camp out back) and he got shit faced and pissed all over the drum kit. It was Xmas and he was wearing a Santa hat. Leaving a Ten Ton Ltd. show wasn’t easy, due to the dark, winding forest road and all the drunks heading home.

After discovering the killer power of the Carter Family Martha Atwell started playing traditional songs and mixing them in with her own spastic Shaggs-influenced originals. Martha recorded her version of the traditional song “Wildwood Flower” in her underwear.

Thomas Hendrix (who plays “Chance,” star of Kill the Moonlight) sings on it. He quit his job selling pots and pans door to door in Georgia in the late ’70’s and drifted around Florida and Louisiana working in the oil fields. At one point he lost his mind, stole some cars, and ended up on a chain gang. Then in ’87 he drove a station wagon to Hollywood to become a rock star. Back then he was making some classic four track tapes including the infamous “I Can’t Stop Smoking Crack” and the psychedelic “Mr. Green Jeans”. Disaster struck in ’92 when most of his music equipment was ripped off by junkies, and again in ’94 when he was stabbed in the neck by his evil twin Bob. For the last year or so, he’s been playing with his new band Tommy and the Demons.

Pam Aronoff was a biker in Massachusetts who rode her hog our to California’s Big Oaks Lodge. She moved into a cabin in back of the lodge and started booking bands to play there on weekends. Late one night after the bar quieted down, Pam returned to her cabin and her computer, sat down, put on her helmet to compose the satirical pieces for Kill the Moonlight, “Clear” and “TV Jazz”. The sick ass positive thinking voice-over rap on “Clear” was read by Ross Harris and written by Steven Hanft.

Delta Garage started at a dive on 14th Street in New York City, the illustrious Eagle Tavern, serving up free franks & beans at their shows which led to their early following in derelicts. Every Saturday night the singer and his girlfriend would pull up to the bar in their beat up old Nova – jammed full of drums, guitars, a ten pound bag of dry ice, the light show (two clamp on lamps with colored gels), amps, their baby girl, the drummer and rhythm guitarist, a hot plate – the spare tire tied to the roof with a big rope. The bass player, Ira, was too tall and had to take the subway. The lead singer guitarist Dick Revion from Waco, Texas is something to see live. The one time I saw Delta Garage play Revion looked to be in his mid forties had greasy short hair and was wearing an old fucked up tuxedo. He played about 10 songs without any lead breaks. The whole time there was a glass of whiskey sitting on a chair in front of him. Finally in one smooth motion Revion drank the whiskey and went into an awesome lead. The eight or nine people in the audience went nuts.

The Pussy Willows started out with three girls singing backed by various scum rockers including members of the GG Allin band and Gun Club. They made a record which includes covers of the Kinks “Come On Now” and Neil Diamond’s “the Boat That I Row”. They toured the mill towns of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, usually opening with the surreal epic “Vindaloo” featured on this album. The song includes Telegu (a south-east Indian language) lyrics which translate: “all you men without dicks get out of here”. Some of you might recognize Pussywillow’s Elinor Blake’s voice through her current sexy incarnation as Ye-Ye Music icon April March.

The Powder Monkeys are pure drunk Australian dudes. They recorded their cover of “The Wizard” inside of a dumpster that was on fire because of a nuclear bomb that exploded in nearby New Zealand.

From one of lead singer Michael Chandler’s tour diaries – The Raunch Hands van rolls along a postcard-perfect two-lane road in Austria. The drive began a few hours after last night’s final encore. The band have brought with them a large cache of that town’s local spirits and have left behind a nightclub janitor’s worst nightmare, a restaurateur who is questioning his career choice, various bodily secretions, a cymbal stand which will catch up to the band four nations from today, a very happy dug dealer, and a whole bunch of people who will be calling in sick to work today. Within the van are the five band members, chattering, smoking, thoughtlessly, incessantly drinking, their driver/roadie/sound man/entertainment coordinator/day nurse, and an investment banker from Bonn, Germany who quit the firm to go on the road with these guys and sell T-shirts. He is curled up in a corner, unconscious. He sports the same Armani suit that he wore to the Bonn gig, a single Italian wing-tip, and a five-day growth of beard. Crumpled in his hand is a recent article from a Frankfurt newspaper reporting his sudden disappearance. He is very pale and will probably have to be dumped off at a clinic in a few days, but he has a huge smile on his face and carries a very handy VISA Gold card. The van approaches tonight’s venue, a youth center housed in a 19th Century women’s prison which lords over a high, verdant hill. The band is a half hour early as the van winds its way upward. A few youth center volunteers lounge by the club entrance, turning in unison when they hear the thumping bass emanating from the van which is still about 300 meters away. The van pulls up, and its doors spring open “That’s Life”, by Frank Sinatra is blaring insanely. As the band emerges, about twenty empty wine and beer bottles clatter to the drive. The Raunch Hands have a stretch, adjust their shades, and survey the ex-prison as if they have just arrived home after a long trip and want to see if the place looks the same. One of the youth center people has run inside to tell her co-workers about the spectacle by the door. The entire staff now fills the entrance, gaping. The band, oblivious, wordlessly thread through them and split up inside the club for the dressing room, the bar, the crapper. The bartender returns to his post and asks the band members seated there, “What means ‘raunch’?” “It’s time to do it all over again”.

DETAILS:
ARTWORK:
Front Cover Illustration: Lisa Dembling
Art Direction: Eli Bonerz
All stills are from the film Kill the Moonlight by Steven Hanft

BARCODE: n/a

MATRIX: “RB03274SFTRI482 IFPI L151”

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