V/A feat. Pussy Galore – Gimme Indie Rock Vol. 1 (CD, US)

21 March 2000 K-Tel 6453-2
DISC 1:
01. Husker Du – Pink Turns To Blue
02. Dinosaur Jr. – Little Furry Things
03. My Dad Is Dead – Too Far Gone
04. The Wedding Present – My Favorite Dress
05. The Chills – I Love My Leather Jacket
06. The Fall – Cruisers Creek
07. Pussy Galore – Sweet Little Hi-Fi
08. Mudhoney – Touch Me I’m Sick
09. Half Japanese – U.S.Teens Are Spoiled Bums
10. Big Dipper – She’s Fetching
11. Nikki Sudden – Jangle Town
12. Eleventh Dream Day – Watching The Candles Burn
13. Giant Sand – Black Venetian Blind
14. Meat Puppets – Swimming Ground
15. Scrawl – I’m Ready

DISC 2:
01. The Feelies – Slipping Into Something
02. Yo La Tengo – Barnaby, Hardly Working
03. The Wipers – Nothing Left To Lose
04. Squirrel Bait -Sun God
05. The Minutemen – Political Song For Michael Jackson To Sing
06. Savage Republic – Andelusia
07. The Mekons – Ghosts Of American Astronauts
08. Galaxie 500 – Blue Thunder
09. Spacemen 3 – Take Me To The Other Side
10. The Flaming Lips – Everything’s Explodin’
11. The Melvins – Creepy Smell
12. Black Flag – Black Coffee
13. Death Of Samantha – Coca-Cola & Licorice
14. The Pastels – I’m Alright With You
15. The Vaselines – Molly’s Lips

V/A feat. Pussy Galore - Gimme Indie Rock Vol. 1 (CD, US) - Cover

V/A feat. Pussy Galore - Gimme Indie Rock Vol. 1 (CD, US) - Rear

VIEW:
NOTES:
Double CD compilation featuring Sweet Little Hi-Fi by Pussy Galore (originally released on Sugarshit Sharp).

Scroll down for extensive sleeve notes by Scott Becker (who also wrote ‘We Rock So You Don’t Have To’).

SONG CREDITS:
Compilation Producers: Scott Becker/Patrick Whalen

1.1. Husker Du – Husker Du
Writer: Hart
Published: Nora Hi Art admin by Bug Music (BMI)
(p) 1984 SST Records courtesy of SST Records
Run Time: 2:39

1.2. Dinosaur Jr – Little Furry Things
Writer: Mascis
Published: Spam As The Bread Music/Zomba Songs Inc (BMI)
(p) 1989 Homestead Records courtesy of SST Records
Run Time: 3:05

1.3. My Dad Is Dead – Too Far Gone
Writer:
Published:
(p)
Run Time:

1.4. The Wedding Present – My Favourite Dress
Writer: Gedge
Published: EMI Music/Halim Music (PRS)
(p) 1987 Reception Records/Play It Again Sam courtesy of Cooking Vinyl
Run Time: 4:14

1.5. The Chills – I Love My Leather Jacket
Writer: Phillips
Published: Flying Nun Music/Mushroom Music (adm by Bab-A-Lew Songs) (ASCAP)
(p) 1986 Flying Nun Records courtesy of Flying Nun Records
Run Time: 2:53

1.6. The Fall – Cruisers Creek Writer: Smith/Smith
Published: Murder Music (PRS)
(p) 1986 Beggars Banquet Records Limited licensed courtesy of Beggars Banquet
Run Time: 4:16

1.7. Pussy Galore – Sweet Little Hi-Fi
Writer: Spencer
Published: Jon Spencer (BMI)
(p) 1988 Caroline Records courtesy of Jon Spencer
Run Time: 3:04

1.8. Mudhoney – Touch Me I’m Sick
Writers: Arm/Luke/Peters/Turner
Publlished: Better Than Your Music (BMI)
(p) 1988 Sub Pop Records courtesy of Sub Pop Records from the album ‘Super Fuzz Big Muff’

1.9. Half Japanese – US Teens Are Spoiled Bums
Writer: Fair
Published: Sit Boy Girl Music admin by Bug Music (BMI)
(p) Safe House Records Comm. Ltd courtesy of Safe GHouse Comm Ltd.
Run Time: 1:07

1.10. Big Dipper – She’s Fetching
Writers: Goffrier/Mickeyer/Oliphant/Valeik
Published: Big Dipper Songs (BMI)
(p) 1987 Homestead Records Comm. Ltd
Run Time: 2:44

1.11. Nikki Sudden – Jangle Town
Writer: Sudden
Published: Incomplete Music Inc. (BMI)
(p) 1990 Creation Records courtesy of Creation Records
Run Time: 4:28

1.12. Eleventh Dream Day – Watching The Candles Burn
Writer: Figl
Published: Mangel Mrzel admin. by Bug Music (BMI)
(p) 1988 AMoeba Records courtesy of Ameoba Records
Run Time: 4:01

1.13. Giant Sand – Black Venetian Blind
Writer: Gelb
Published: Amazing Black Sand Music adm. by Bug Music (BMI)
(p) 1985 Black Sand Records courtesy of Om Om Recordings
Run Time: 3:26

1.14. Meat Puppets – Swimming Ground
Writer: Kirkwood
Published: Meat Puppets Music (BMI)
(p) 1999 The Meat Puppets Partnership courtesy of Rykodisc
Run Time: 3:04

1.15. Scrawl – I’m Ready
Writers: Harste/Mays/O’Leary
Published: Cripes Publishing Liability Co. (BMI)
(p) 1989 Rough Trade Records courtesy of Scrawl
Run Time: 3:01

2.1. The Feelies – Slipping Into Something
Writers: Mercer/Milan
Published: Incomplete Music Inc. (BMI)
(p) 1986 Coyote Records All Rights Reserved courtesy of Restless Records
Run Time: 6:01

2.2. Yo La Tengo – Barnaby, Hardly Working
Writer: Hubley/Kaplan
Published: Rashashauna Music (BMI)
(p) 1989 Coyote Records All Rights Reserved courtesy of Restless Records
Run Time: 4:18

2.3. The Wipers – Nothing Left To Lose
Writer: Sage
Published: EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Part Music (BMI)
(p) 1986 The Enigma Entertainment Corporation courtesy of Restless Records
Run Time: 4:50

2.4. Squirrel Bait -Sun God
Writer: Grubbs
Published: Gastr Virgo Music (BMI)
(p) 19895/1997 Dexters Cigar/Drag City courtesy of Dexters Cigar/Drag City
Run Time: 2:47

2.5. The Minutemen – Political Song For Michael Jackson To Sing
Writer: Watt
Published: New Alliance Music (BMI)
(p) 1989 SST Records courtesy of SST Records
Run Time: 1:31

2.6. Savage Republic – Andelusia
Writers: Bialil/Erskine/Furbrmarn/Grnte/Licher/Loveless/Part
Published: Savage Republic Music (BMI)
(p) 1986 Independent Project Records courtesy of Independent Project Records
Run Time: 4:40

2.7. The Mekons – Ghosts Of American Astronauts
Writers: Greenhalgh/Langford/Lycett
Published: Low Noise America Music (BMI)
(p) 1988 Mekons/Low Noise. Meckons appear courtesy of Quarterstick Records
Run Time: 3:47

2.8. Galaxie 500 – Blue Thunder
Writer: Krutoius/Wareham/Yong
Published: Zebulon Music admin. by Bug Music (BMI)
(p) 1990 Galaxie 500 courtesy of Rykodisc
Run Time: 3:45

2.9. Spacemen 3 – Take Me To The Other Side
Writers: Kember/Pierce
Published: Incomplete Music (BMI)
(p) 1999 Third Stage Limited courtesy of Third Stone Limited
Run Time: 4:37

2.10. The Flaming Lips – Everything’s Explodin’
Writers: Coyne/English/Ivines
Published: EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Lovely Sorts of Death Music (BMI)
(p) 1987 Restless Records courtesy of Restless Records
Run Time: 4:44

2.11. The Melvins – Creepy Smell
Writer: King Buzzo
Published: Copyright Control
(p) 1989 Boner Records courtesy of Ipecac Recordings
Run Time: 2:05

2.12. Black Flag – Black Coffee
Writer: Ginn
Published: Cesstone Music (BMI)
(p) 1989 SST Records courtesy of SST Records
Run Time: 4:55

2.13. Death Of Samantha – Coca-Cola & Licorice
Writer: Petlovic
Published: Bad Clarinet Songs adm. by Bug Music (ASCAP)
(p) 1985 Saint Valentine Records courtesy of John Petlovic
Run Time: 3:33

2.14. The Pastels – I’m Alright With You
Writers: Hayward/McRobbie/Pastel/Simpson/Taylor/Wright
Published: Momentum Music Ltd. (BMI)
(p) 1987 Glass Records courtesy of The Pastels and Momentum Music
Run Time: 3:18

2.15. The Vaselines – Molly’s Lips
Writers: Kelly/McKee
Published: Copyright Control
(p) 1992 Sub Pop Records courtesy of Sub Pop Records from the album The Way of The Vaselines
Run Time: 1:44

SLEEVE NOTES:
Liner Notes: Scott Becker

“Gimme Indie Rock: History Lesson Part I

“The how, the why, the where, the who – can these words find the truth?” – d. boon

A lot of folks, some of whom I even like, think the 60’s were the Gold Years of rock. Fuck that.

I’ll concede that the period framed by the British Invasion and the Woodstock Nation produced a fair share of great bands. The Beatles, the Stones, the Experience, the Airplane-you can name ’em just as well as I can. And loads of strung-out longhairs wrote groovy songs that graying elementary teachers sing for their little tykes to this very day.

But scratch your own way past the superficial scrim of the era’s brightest stars and you’ll discover a hollow wasteland. I mean, how many really great discs came out in those days when the LOP-as-statement was ascendant? The number is pretty finite, as you can tell by the way they still clog the playlists of America’s unrepentant classic rock stations. Sure, I atill reach for my copies of Surrealistic Pillow and Highway 61 Revisited, but does anyone ever listen to complete albums by the Strawberry Alarm clock, the Chocolate Watch Band or the Vanilla Fudge?

They most certainly do not. And that’s why, in the 90’s, a twerp like Burt Bacharach was considered cool and a band like Iron Butterfly wasn’t.

Further, the frequently and deservedly maligned ’70s were a musical black hole simply because rock had turned into a business and rock stardom had become a respectable profession. The music no longer mattered: as pure, crowd-pleasing entertainment, there is no difference whatsoever between ABBA and KISS.

Fans deserved their share of the blame, too: you know those Styx and Bob Seger lovers who burned piles of disco records at a major league sporting event? Remember, they were alleging the superiority of their music taste. Meanwhile, the same midwestern radio jocks who egged on the disco-sucks knuckleheads never played useful rock iconoclasts like the New York Dolls, Television and Patti Smith, probably because they came from a city which even the president said could “drop dead.” (As to why all the culprits in this saga are from Michigan or Illinois, maybe that’s just my own bicoastal bias. But I doubt it.)

So pop culture atomized into warring factions, while all the cool shit was happening on the fringes: loft jazz and Jamaican dub, German electronic music and Canterbury prog-rock, the early years of hip-hop and punk. That’s why the only people who care about the 70’s today are pot-bellied record collectors and the Hollywood idiots who produce campy, “retro” TV series. You wouldn’t want to share a cell with any of ’em.

Still, lots of smart kids were growing up during those years, and the combos they formed in the ’80s made the best,. Most impassioned rock ‘n’ roll ever, From the ’60s they’d learned the value of tunefulness and the life-changing power of a perfect LP (precisely divided into two sides of equal impact). From the ’70s they borrowed the do-it-yerself ethos of punk, applying its lessons to every aspect of their bands: from attitude and attire to self-booked tours and self-run labels.

Like communism, it was a good theory, and everyone conveniently forgot that even the Clash was a major label act. So amazing bands sprang out of nowhere, made phenomenal albums and burned out faster than you can say “my distributor didn’t pay me.” Mission of Burma, Dream Syndicate, Au Pairs, Pylon, the Proletariat, Flipper, Method Actors, Bush Tetras, 100 Flowers, Birthday Party – I can’t tell you exactly which one caused the dirty ringing tone that persists in my left ear, but I vaguely recall seeing bands of this calibre on an almost nightly basis.

And that was just the early ’80s, By the middle of the decade – as defined by the arbitrary if necessary parameters of this collection’s historical mission – the world of independent rock was in full flower. Mesmerizing bands criss-crossed the country in bands, and chances are that every week a couple of ‘em were playing someplace near whereever you were living at the time. It’s essential to recall that back then, hardly anybody cared.

So listen to old gramps here and I’ll tell you why that made the music even better: there was no money in it. The glossy mags didn’t care. The major labels didn’t care. The commercial radio stations didn’t care. And nobody even know what the hell a corporate tour sponsor was.

You made those insanely great records and played your heart out onstage just because you wanted to. Yeah, I know. It’s hard to imagine.

Fortunately, the music galvanized a few fervent fans – enough of ’em, anyway, to keep the feeble flame alive. Some of us were putting out fanzines or holding down slots at college radio; some of us launched indie labels or even started our own bands. A couple of random dudes in the very latter category became the most famous fans of all: the Melvins’ Buzz Osbourne was the guy who in turn, turned Kurt Cobain on to punk.

Kurt was no slouch when it came to forcing his favorites on his own fans, God bless him. Had that not been the case, it is utterly certain the Vaselines’ exceedingly obscure pop genius would have remianed so. On the other hand, the Meat Puppets already had their place in the indie rock pantheon – Kurt just made sure the MTV masses knew it, too.

Passed on like secret handshakes, the names of great, neglected, almost-forgotten bands became transformed into legends. Meanwhile, former rock scribes and college DJs have moved up the industry’s ladder of influence and power, forcing even the top brass at a conglomerate like K-tel to sit up and beg for a piece of the action. And so you now hold a compilation of tracks by many of those “legendary” indie rockers of the ’80’s.

But let’s be frank.

A few come by their greatness honestly: they bought originality and conviction to every note they played. Others merely had their moments, or were guilty by association. If you band was friendly with Thurston Moore, or was on Homestead, or garnered simultaneous attention from Forced Exposure, Matter and Away From the Pulsebeat, you could have been in the club, too. Context was everything.

But then, that’s exactly why this set includes the acknowledged poobahs of indie rock alongside some of it’s lost gems. Argue amongst yourselves as to who should have been left off this collection or who else should have been included, but the fact is that it’s merely a matter of a cut-away view. These are just some of the groups who made the records which made the ’80s sound the way thatt I remember them.

Black Flag – to cite just one of my favorite acts in here-were loud, rude, and over the top, but they had a sense of control and a singular approach to sound that was the mark of genius. Other groups – the Mekons, the Fall – had their roots in the earliest moments of the ’70s punk explosion, and endured by investigating the promise and possibility that came with punk theory. (If you thought punk was about safety pins and spikey hair, you were dead before the ’80s began.)

In fact, as large as punk loomed before every one of these artistes, you could couldn’t call a single one here “punk.” The Melvins or the Minutemen might have worn the handle proudly, but their music was always bigger and therefore better than that. So from Half Jap’s naïve yelp to Squirrel Bait’s ungodly squawk, the contrived primitivism of punk was just another contrairian tactic. Given the truly calculated garbage being spewed by the music industry, indie artifice didn’t seem half bad.

Not that some of these bands were afraid to put the “art” in artifice. Savage Republic mashed-up serf music, industrial clatter and Middle Eastern vibes and wound up sounding like nothing else around. My Dad Is Dead put his angry, morose journal on a four-track and released the results, while Nikki Sudden turned his scarves-and-candles romanticism into a persona that was sorta like the anti-Stevie Nicks. Pussy Galore celebrated sex and sludge; while Spacemen 3 worshipped drugs and, uh, harder drugs.

In the end, you’d need a whole roomful of records – old-fashion LPs and shelves full of 7-inch vinyl, too – to illustrate what those years were all about. If you were there and have your won mental scrapbook, you’ll surely recall gigs which left you spent and happy in a way that only good sex can approximate.

But maybe you were too young then, or heaven knows, not yet a twinkle in the starry sky. For those mere babes among you, indulge me while I rattle off a few of the ’80s moments that made my own life less pathetic: the wipers in a basement dive in Boston… Scrawl during a New York music convention, playing only to folks who cared enough to traipse out to Hoboken… Husker Du inciting a giant mosh pit in a cavernous hall at UCLA… Yo La Tengo in a tender acoustic in-store… Flaming Lips on a stage that seemed to be on fire… or Sonic Youth before an actual bonfire in the goddamn Mojave Desert (sorry, but they couldn’t be here with us today)

And the Minutemen, who I must have seen a hundred times. Because every mother-lovin’ moment of the Minutemen onstage was better than heroin, better than Jesus, better than chocolate-covered cherries. And when the best band in the world is just a bunch of local chumps who play in crummy neighbourhood bars every weekend – could life get any better? Believe or not, that’s the way it was in cities across America.

And that, kids, is what made the ‘80s such a dandy decade for rock. Okay, I’ve conveniently ignored all that horrible pop and new wave crap that MTV got behind, not to mention those fuckin’ awful hairspray bands. So what? I can’t vouch for anybody else, but I spent those years listening to nothing but good music, because there was plenty of it.

Crazy enough, a couple of dog years later some of those old pups soldier on. Having inspired a fair hunk of the indie rock of the ’90s, quite a few of the acts showcased herein still churn out quality noise themselves. Last year, critics and consumers alike salivated over the Flaming Lips’ The Soft Bulletin; this year Yo La Tengo will break hearts with their umpteenth masterpiece, And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out. Scotland’s Pastels continue to shamble about in much the same shy manner; Nikki Sudden and the Chills’ Martin Phillips, too. Giant Sand mastermind Howe Gelb gets less predictable with each passing year, while his desert compadres the Meat Puppets are said to be plotting a comeback. Meanwhile the Mekons, the Fall, Half Japanese and the Melvins all stagger happily on.

For that matter, the wrthing spawn of the acts on Gimme Indie Rock could still break you used-CD budget for months on end: Spiritualized, the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Royal Trux, Scenic, Mike Watt, Cobra Verde, Henry Rollins Band, Tortoise, Gastr del Sol, Freakwater, Luna, Bob Mould, Grant Hart, Sebadoh… Dude, it’s history as living cacophony. And as my close personal acquaintance and frequent talk show guest Prof. Byron Coley always says: guh.

As usual, he’s absolutely right.

Scott Becker
January 8, 2000

Scott Becker is the founder/publisher of OPTION Magazine.”

DETAILS:
ARTWORK: [unknown]

BARCODE: 022775645323

MATRIX:
CD 1: “L806 8320 64532A M00223-12 A @”
CD 2: “L806 8320 64532B M00327-02 A @”

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