Mississippi Fred McDowell – I Do Not Play No Rock ‘n’ Roll [Stereo] (LP, US)

1969 Capitol Capitol ST 409
A1. Baby Please Don’t Go
A2. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
A3. Kokomo Me Baby
A4. That’s All Right Baby
A5. Red Cross Store

B1. Everybody’s Down On Me
B2. 61 Highway
B3. Glory Hallelujah
B4. Jesus Is On The Mainline

Mississippi Fred McDowell - I Do Not Play No Rock 'n' Roll [Stereo] (LP, US) - Cover
VIEW:
NOTES:
Black vinyl LP released in 1969 (UK, 1970), also issued as a mono album (SM 409) and re-issued as an expanded single disc CD and as a double CD with alternate artwork.

Rear sleeve features four columns of text which consists of Mississippi Fred McDowell talking about ‘the blues’ (scroll down for the rear sleeve text).

The song Talk About The Blues by Jon Spencer Blues Explosion was written as a direct response to a Rolling Stone review of Now I Got Worry and Q&A with Jon Spencer.

“The review asked “what right young, white boys have to play the blues, the scribe opined that “Spencer’s faux backwoods drawl verges on minstrel-show insult.”

What actually sent Spencer off, however, was a tamer Rolling Stone Q&A, in which he answered earnest queries about how a New Hampshire boy fresh from sneeing punk deconstructionists Pussy Galore fell for the authentic blues music of Hound Dog Taylor and Mississippi Fred McDowell.

After the interview – perhaps feeling his authenticity in question, perhaps frustrated that the soul, funk and hip-hop sides of his band get overlooked because of the name Blues Explosion – Spencer sat down and wrote “Talk About The Blues.””

CMJ New Music Monthly: Acme Blues Explosives, INC

The song lyric features a the line “I do not play no blues, I play rock and roll” which is a reference to the title of this album.

In a later Rolling Stone interview (click here to read full text) Jon Spencer said “I’d rather be known as a rock & roller. I mean we don’t really play blues. How would you describe it? It’s the exact opposite of Mississippi Fred McDowell. He’d always say, “I do not play no rock & roll.” He had a record called that, too. ”

Talk About The Blues was commercially released as single on 7″ (UK), CD (UK/US) and 12″ (UK/US).

SONG CREDITS:
Recorded: September 8-10, 1969 at Malaco Sound Recording Studios, in Jackson, Miss.
Produced: Tommy Couch for Malaco Productions
Guitar/Vocals: Fred McDowell
Bass: Jerry Puckett
Drums: Darin Lancaster

A1. Baby Please Don’t Go
Writer: Joe Williams
Published: MCA Music, ASCAP
Run Time: 4:48

A2. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 4:26

A3. Kokomo Me Baby
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 3:00

A4. That’s All Right Baby
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 5:04

A5. Red Cross Store
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 4:04

B1. Everybody’s Down On Me
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 9:12

B2. 61 Highway
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 4:43

B3. Glory Hallelujah
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 2:47

B4. Jesus Is On The Mainline
Writer: Fred McDowell
Published: Malaco/Kenisco Music, BMI
Run Time: 3:38

Album coordinator for Capitol Records: Wayne Shuler

SLEEVE NOTES:
“Mississippi Fred McDowell
“I do not play no rock ‘n’ roll”

Fred McDowell introduces himself and his music on this album. But unless you’re from Mississippi it’s hard to understand his rich county dialect. Here’s what he says about himself:

“My name is Fred McDowell. They call me Mississippi Fred McDowell. But my home’s in Rossville, Tennessee. But it don’t make any different. It sound good to me, and I seem like I’m at home there when I’m in Mississippi…and I do not play no rock and roll, y’all. I just play straight ‘n’ natchel blue. And whenever you get somebody, you know, you want to plow for you, you just call for Fred McDowell. Hmmm. I were raised on the farm, you unnerstand. Now the only way you can have rock Fred you have to put him in a rocking chair, or you just lay me down, you unnerstand, see heah…that’s my type of rocking…yeh heh!

“And my type of blue, I play it with a bottleneck. I first got this style from a beef bone you unnerstand, see. Rib what come out of a steak. My uncle when i was a small boy in the country, he ground this bone down and filed it with a file and put it on his little finger, but I play it on my ring finger you unnerstand…and this here bottleneck sound better’n the bone because you get more clear sound out of it. And I would like for you to…who’s ever listening to me over here by one of the tapes or album or anything…I like, I like for you to listen then what I’m saying I’d make the gitar say what I say, you unnerstand. If I say “Our Father” it say “Our Father.” If I give out a hymn it’ll say it. If I play “Amazing Grace” it’ll sing that too. Now that’s my style what you hear me doing there. I hope y’all like it, who’s never git it.”

(He starts playing with a strong, pure, beat; clear and clean. Then he slides the bottleneck up the strings playing semi-melodic runs. And he sings, five songs on the first side. Then he explains the philosophy and history of his music; his blues.)

“This is…this is here what I want you to unnerstand…I want y’all to unnerstand. The congregation. Everybody don’t know what the blues is. Now you take up when I was a boy…just like I first told y’all my home was in Rossville, Tennessee. Okay? Now what we call the blues now, at that time you know what they call them? A reel. That what the blue come from. A reel. Now you don’t know what a reel is, do you? Okay. Alright, it just like a…old people raised you when I was coming on. You go to church, you call yourself confessing religion. Okay. Well everybody had god confidence in you, you unnerstand, that you really done confess. Well you turn around, from the church song and start singing that. Well they didn’t call it a blues then, they called it a reel, you unnerstand. Well the reel came from…the blues came from the reel. They changed it, just to say blues, you unnerstand. Just like, er…your mother and father raised you into it and you told yourself when I come on. They heard you singing something. N’huh! He ain’t got nothin! I heard him singing a reel, yesterdiddy, see. Okay. But er…but a blue…and a reel is all the same.

“And I’ll tell you about the blues, how this…how they work. Okay. It’s a many different ways that the blues work. here you go. Okay. Just like you take me. Er, or that fellow yonder that’s running that mike. You and him being together for a year, running together for a year, huh? You beginning to gain all confidence in him you unnerstand, see. You let him have any amount of money he asks as long as you got it. And when he gets something in his hand, to catch you down, he’ll turn you down. Or else he’ll get with another crowd and misuse you with somebody else you unnerstand, you see. Well the first thing you say, you get off yourself, see, not whilst you’re there, you get off to yourself and get to studying, you say, I wouldn’t have thought so-and-so would have did me like that, close as I thought me and him was, you unnerstand, see, huh? Well see that was your mind, man y’see. And if you can do this…if you can play this thing…well the more you play…the bluer you get, until you get to it.

“You see I have got up out of bed and played the thing. And me and my wife have got into it. And I got up out the bed. She was sleep. Went in other room and played. Played the blues. When I got satisfied I put it down, went on, went to bed and went to sleep. You see, it was off of my mind, it’s a worrisome thing, but it works so many different way. You see, you can be as nice to so many people. You see that’s the way they work, just like that, just like you nice to me, okay, he nice to me. Well, you get confidence…confidence make love, you know, twixt omen or either man. Well you got confidence, say well that’s my friend. You tell the next person, oh yeah, and me and him good bosom friends…that’s my friend yonder. Well, you know that some of your friends deceive you some times. But yet and still, you got that confidence in you you wouldn’t have figured he wouldn’t have figured he would have did you like that, see. Well you can say now….”

He plays the guitar.

“You see that was the reason I was…you know just like so many people say how you make that sound like this…

Lord my best friend, baby,
Done turn his back
on me…

See that’s it…that’s in you. See so many people misue you…you don’t know how they come by it.

Lord I don’t know why
everybody down on me…”

And so on. But you have to hear it. It’s beautiful. Straight ‘n’ natchel
blue. It makes you dance.
Play it and see.”

DETAILS:
ARTWORK:
Cover/Liner Photo: Capitol Photo Studio: Bob Worthern

BARCODE: n/a

RUN-OUT GROOVE ENGRAVING:
A: [unknown]
B: [unknown]

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